Pen as Sword - Social Commentary, Politics and Economics

Disparate Data in the Eather … part 4

(continued from part 3) … Using low-yield weapons and airbursts, this figure drops to as little as 700 fatalities! This makes using nuclear weapons thinkable for the first time since the 1940s. The B61-12 only encourages this trend further.

***

So what has all this to do with Canadian nukes? Well, here’s a clue:  f35-2-bays The F-35A CTOL (conventional take off and landing) will be capable of carrying two B61-12 nuclear bombs, one in each bay.  See that little Canadian flag on the side of the fuselage. That’s the Canadian F-35 we mentioned in part 2 of this series. This aircraft is intended to be one of the primary delivery systems for the new B61-12 guided tactical nuclear bomb.

So as I mentioned in the first paragraph in part 1, I think we are looking at the opening moves in Canada re-joining the international nuclear club. Compared to Iran and North Korea we are a much better candidate (better looking too).  Who would you rather your daughter go on a date with, a North Korean, an Iranian,  or a nice clean cut Canadian. That’s really a no-brainer right?

Would having a nuclear capable Canada help NATO and the US if the US becomes deeply involved in a standoff in the South China Sea? This has all happened before. I have a personal memory of a Canadian “fighter” jet from the 60’s and 70’s. It was called the CF-104 and entered Canadian service in March 1962. I knew a pilot. He transferred from CF-104 to Sea Kings after having to eject from an exploding CF-104 on takeoff (early 70’s). He still thought it was a great jet but it was more relaxing flying Sea Kings. Whatever, all pilots are kinda “out there”. The CF-104 was originally designed as a supersonic interceptor aircraft, but it was used primarily for low-level strike and reconnaissance by the RCAF. CF-104 Tiger

Eight CF-104 squadrons were originally stationed in Europe as part of Canada’s NATO commitment. This was reduced to six in 1967, with a further reduction to three squadrons in 1970, back when the Liberals were bleeding the Forces to death by fiscal attrition under Hauptsturmführer Paul Hellyer. Up to 1971, this included a nuclear strike role that would see Canadian aircraft armed with US-supplied nuclear weapons in the event of a conflict with Warsaw Pact forces.

Low level attack runs in the CF-104 were done visually at 100 feet AGL and at speeds up to 600Kts. Low level evasive maneuvers could increase speeds to supersonic. The 104 was very difficult to attack owing to its small size, speed, and low altitude capability.

Dave Jurkowski, former CF-104 and CF-18 pilot is quoted “Because of our speed, size and lower level operations, no Canadian Zipper driver was ever ‘shot down’ by either air or ground threats in the three Red Flag Exercises in which we participated.”

So the contemplation of and preparation for a nuclear strike role is not new to the Canadian Armed Forces and the last time was under the Liberals. Pay special attention to the operational history section of this article in Wikipedia.baden-28a

We are again adding a nuclear strike role with a nuclear capable stealth strike aircraft to our arsenal. In spite of those Liberal promises to keep Canada nuclear free, they have no history of keeping any of their promises if they are not convenient.  There is no way that Harper’s Conservatives would feel bound by the promises of a mob of chestless pink tribe socialists.

Speculating about the future … does Canada need Iron Dome to defend nuclear strike assets in a Middle East context, such as a Canadian Expeditionary Force stationed in Israel?

It wouldn’t be out of character. Canada has always been a staunch defender of Israel‘s right not only to exist but to thrive. I don’t know how Israel would feel being associated with a bunch of baby murdering progressives but needs must when the devil drives.

Israel hasn’t got a lot of friends these days, now that the Americans have thrown them under the bus. The Iron Dome deal represents just another example of significant transfer of Israeli defense technology to Canada. We used Israeli systems even back in the 70’s when all our night vision equipment came from Israel. They were just about the only systems we had that were not older than the crews manning them.

A left front view of two multinational variable-swept-winged Tornado aircraft taking off at the Farnborough Air Show.

A left front view of two multinational variable-swept-winged Tornado aircraft taking off at the Farnborough Air Show.

It is reasonable to suppose that Canada and Great Britain could easily work together in this sort of expedition as both have massive common experience in the Sand Box and share a common heritage.

The Brits fly the Tornado which is also a planned platform for the new B61-12. Any one want to lay odds on an integrated Israeli, British, Canadian combined arms force with tactical nuclear capability protected by Iron Dome, handing the Iranians their collective asses on a plate in any regional conflict, even without US involvement?

The notion that we can rely on the US under regimes like Obama’s or perhaps Billery’s is delusional at best and downright suicidal at worst.

Just a thought.

Cheers

Joe

knight_templar_battle_weary

 

Nitpickers, ya know the drill.

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