Life in a small town

Cancer … and the Ketogenic diet …

WooHoo!  The Cancer book arrived today. “This book is dedicated to the millions of people who have suffered and died from toxic cancer therapies“. Just about says it all. From the Amazon.com blurb … “The book addresses controversies related to the origins of cancer and provides solutions to cancer management and prevention.

It expands upon Otto Warburg’s well-known theory that all cancer is a disease of energy metabolism. However, Warburg did not link his theory to the “hallmarks of cancer” and thus his theory was discredited. This book aims to provide evidence, through case studies, that cancer is primarily a metabolic disease requiring metabolic solutions for its management and prevention.

Support for this position is derived from critical assessment of current cancer theories. Brain cancer case studies are presented as a proof of principle for metabolic solutions to disease management, but similarities are drawn to other types of cancer, including breast and colon, due to the same cellular mutations that they demonstrate.”

Dr. Thomas N. Seyfried

Dr. Thomas N. Seyfried

And from the back cover … “Supported by evidence from more than 1,000 scientific and clinical studies, this groundbreaking book demonstrates that cancer is a metabolic disease and, more importantly, that it can be more effectively managed and prevented when it is recognized as such.

Moreover, the book provides detailed evidence that the traditional view of cancer as a genetic disease has been largely responsible  for the failure to develop effective therapies and preventive strategies.

From the abstract of the article found here  at the U.S. National Library of Medicine I highlight and quote the connection to what this book is about and the Ketogenic diet as follows : “Emerging evidence indicates that cancer is primarily a metabolic disease involving disturbances in energy production through respiration and fermentation.

The genomic instability observed in tumor cells and all other recognized hallmarks of cancer are considered downstream epiphenomena of the initial disturbance of cellular energy metabolism. The disturbances in tumor cell energy metabolism can be linked to abnormalities in the structure and function of the mitochondria.

When viewed as a mitochondrial metabolic disease, the evolutionary theory of Lamarck can better explain cancer progression than can the evolutionary theory of Darwin. Cancer growth and progression can be managed following a whole body transition from fermentable metabolites, primarily glucose and glutamine, to respiratory metabolites, primarily ketone bodies.  (this is the connection I want to shine light on between the Ketogenic diet and cancer prevention and treatment.)

As each individual is a unique metabolic entity, personalization of metabolic therapy as a broad-based cancer treatment strategy will require fine-tuning to match the therapy to an individual’s unique physiology.”

As previously posted relating to standards and guidelines, “we are all outliers” unique individuals and there is no “standard Human” to which standards and guidelines apply. Standards and guidelines are created and enforced for the convenience of practitioners and administrators, not people and patients.

It is my personal belief that the “authorities” don’t care if the “guidelines and standards” kill a few hundred thousand patients as long as they can’t be blamed, their well ordered universe is not disturbed and the gravy train is not derailed.

I am not for a minute suggesting individual personal intent in any of this. But we all want to belong to the “In Crowd”, the “right clique”, we all love ourselves and want to think of ourselves as knowing better than the rest of the mob. Peer pressure is a truly diabolical power especially amongst “professionals” whose very livelihood depends on “being on the approved list”.

My 65 years of observation seem to show that humanity is almost universally happy to ignore “truth” and “provable facts” in support of their personal “fantasy”. This is obvious with just a cursory look at everything put out by mainstream media these days.

The current “political” and “economic”polarization of our society bears daily witness to this fact. This problem with “truth” and “provable facts” is especially obvious if “truth” and “provable facts” hurt their chosen fantasy du jour, and becomes a virtual certainty if the fantasy improves their own lot in life.

The short story is we cannot live on bread alone, or cake, or candy, or rice and potatoes or a danish and a latte. We all require fine-tuning (of our diets) to match our life therapy to each individual’s unique physiology. and we cannot live without fat.

Culturally our society appears to be willingly killing ourselves with a diet high in glucose producing carbohydrates because we love our breads, sugars and starches, and we love them enough to try to eat them 6 or 8 times a day.

Many of us have become so metabolically deranged working our glucose metabolism 24/7 365 days a year that our mechanism for safely metabolising glucose has become broken – and that is how we got type 2 diabetes, and a host of other killers like cancer. “Let them eat cake” may be historically inaccurate, but it does seem to be a death sentence for us today.

Those kinds of foods are very cheap to produce and have a very high profit margin. The drugs that our current medical model prescribes to treat the resulting diseases of a cheap high carbohydrate diet have little effect in reversing and curing our current crop of medical killers and many actually create worse problems going forward.

2 Keto Dudes

2 Keto Dudes

As the 2 Keto Dudes say: “We can, however, hack our body into being full time fat burners. This hack not only allows us to maintain safe glucose levels (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19099589), with less medication (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25071075), but improves many of our biomarkers of disease.

If we additionally choose to use this hack to also lose weight it preserves more of our our resting energy expenditure (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1199154) and over time if we have intervened early enough can allow us to reverse the progression of type 2 diabetes (http://www.yorku.ca/mriddell/documents/istype2reversible.pdf).

This dietary strategy is still something that Diabetes Associations around the world are only just now looking at, and Dietetic associations are firmly opposed to, as it is not a modest tweak of their established food pyramid, but a complete upending of it.

There are political issues as well. The USDA has a conflict of interest when it comes to dietary guidelines. That said, the ketogenic diet is quickly becoming the first approach in diabetes management among progressive medical specialists (http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(14)00332-3/pdf).

The bottom line for us is that following the low fat model for the past 40 years has made us fatter and sicker.”

Much more to follow as I delve into this fascinating area.

Cheers

Joe

So much to study … so much to share …

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Life in a small town

Wisdom … and the getting of … we are still waiting for the book … so coat-tails again.

Dr. Thomas N. Seyfried

Dr. Thomas N. Seyfried

Several posts ago I mentioned Dr. Seyfried’s research program. I said I would keep you all posted on how I feel about Dr. Seyfried’s area of research after I have read his book,  or maybe sooner if it goes slower than I expect.

Dr. Seyfried’s research program is focused on the mechanisms by which metabolic therapy manages chronic diseases such as epilepsy, neurodegenerative lipid storage diseases, and cancer. The metabolic therapies include caloric restriction, fasting, and ketogenic diets.

I also mentioned that, I was interested enough that I went ahead and bought the book … yes, $120.00 Canadian might seem to some to be a little steep but often in life one gets what one has paid for. I have spent at least that much and more on a good night out on the town so in the big picture it is really chump change.

2 Keto Dudes

2 Keto Dudes

But it is taking a while to arrive, and thus no progress reading up on this area to date. So in the interim, I give you the 2 Keto Dudes.

The following is from their podcast site at: http://2ketodudes.com/  but it is probably best to visit their site and read and listen to everything they have put up there …

The Science (behind Keto)

Our bodies run on two primary fuels: glucose and fatty acids.

It’s kind of like we have a car with an engine that can run on either gasoline or diesel. We fuel up by eating food. If we eat food containing sugars and starches (carbohydrates) we convert those quickly into glucose and we run as glucose burners. All the cells in our bodies can turn this glucose into energy.

This is why it’s sometimes called our primary fuel. If we eat more glucose than we need for immediate exercise requirements, our livers sweep up the extra glucose and turn it into saturated fat, and sends this (and any fat we have eaten) off to our fat cells to be stored for lean times.

If we don’t eat any carbs and instead eat fat (and moderate protein) most of our cells can easily burn the fatty acids for energy. It could be the fat in our food but it could also be fat that we have stored in case food is ever scarce.

This state is called nutritional ketosis. We often go into ketosis during sleep (if we haven’t eaten a late dinner), and of course anyone doing a fast is running their fat burning engine.

Some cells in the body (and the most metabolically active organ – the brain) can’t burn fatty acids, but your brain can use ketones. These are small water soluble molecules that you make as a by product of metabolizing fats.

Luckily your liver makes glucose even when you don’t eat any carbohydrates, and by a quirk of fate, when it is making glucose for your brain it is also pumping out a lot of ketones.

We evolved to be predominantly fat burners for 11 months of the year. At the end of summer (when ripe fruit is available) we became predominantly glucose burners. We are good at adapting from one mode to the next, although it can take a few weeks for the machinery of fat burning to spin up to full efficiency and put our glucose burning into idle.

Once you are adapted to burning fat (keto-adaptation) and you start eating carbohydrates again, in a few weeks your glucose burning metabolism will be back up at full speed.

In our modern world, however, we are burning glucose all year round, 6 meals a day. Our bodies have forgotten how to burn fat. We just store it and never get a chance to burn it.

Some of us have become so metabolically deranged working our glucose metabolism 24/7 365 days a year that our mechanism for safely metabolising glucose has become broken – and that is how we got type 2 diabetes.

The Ketogenic diet addresses this by forcing your metabolism to predominantly burn fat, restricting your dietary carbohydrates, and relying on your liver to make all the glucose and ketones your brain needs. Most of the rest of your body burns fatty acids directly for energy.

When you give your body fat, it becomes good at burning fat! When you give your body glucose, it becomes good at storing fat!

But what about the studies that show correlation between fat intake and heart disease? If you look carefully, study after study shows that increasing fat intake while eating more than 50 grams of carbohydrates a day will indeed increase heart disease and all that goes with it. These studies fail to remove the carbohydrates!

Some people are good at switching from one mode to the next. Type 2 diabetics, however, have a broken metabolism for dealing with glucose, so when we eat carbohydrates we get progressively worse glucose control and consequently get sicker over decades.

We can, however, hack our body into being full time fat burners. This hack not only allows us to maintain safe glucose levels (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19099589), with less medication (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25071075), but improves many of our biomarkers of disease.

If we additionally choose to use this hack to also lose weight it preserves more of our our resting energy expenditure (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1199154) and over time if we have intervened early enough can allow us to reverse the progression of type 2 diabetes (http://www.yorku.ca/mriddell/documents/istype2reversible.pdf).

This dietary strategy is still something that Diabetes Associations around the world are only just now looking at, and Dietetic associations are firmly opposed to, as it is not a modest tweak of their established food pyramid, but a complete upending of it.

There are political issues as well. The USDA has a conflict of interest when it comes to dietary guidelines. That said, the ketogenic diet is quickly becoming the first approach in diabetes management among progressive medical specialists (http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(14)00332-3/pdf).

The bottom line for us is that following the low fat model for the past 40 years has made us fatter and sicker. In 2012 some 52% of US adults – according to the projections in this study (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2434682) – were either diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (9.1%), or undiagnosed type 2 diabetics (5.2%), or they had a condition called prediabetes, meaning they were metabolically deranged but not quite at diabetic levels (38%).

So, it is no longer just some of us. Most of us are in trouble. That is why we’re 2 keto dudes, and why we’re doing this podcast.

*****

So enjoy the ride – stop with the wheat, the bread, the sweet (continental?) breakfasts, the coffee break donut binge, you know, all that stuff that made us sick by doing what we were told. Love the fat, eat the fat, get healthy!

Cheers

Joe

We weren’t designed to live on fast food and sugar … 

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Life in a small town

Diet, Micro-nutrients, and Health … Part Five Cancer & Ageing & other stuff …

Snow”, by Kobudo, from the album “Ototabi”  (2013)

Continuing in my series of posts, an overview of what I have found about nutrition and diet over the last 15 months or so, information sources which I have found helpful. As mentioned, your mileage may vary but my goal is to stay healthy, happy, and maybe get wise if I live long enough.  Anyway …

2 Keto Dudes

2 Keto Dudes

Well, life is interesting. I am excited by what I have been reading about the work of Dr. Thomas N. Seyfried at Boston College. First  we take a listen to one of the “2 Keto Dudes” podcasts featuring Dr. Seyfried. It is found at  http://2ketodudes.com/show.aspx?episode=113

This got me so excited that I immediately followed up on Thomas N. Seyfried at Boston College, found at:

https://www.bc.edu/bc-web/schools/mcas/departments/biology/people/faculty-directory/thomas-seyfried.html

Thomas N. Seyfried

Thomas N. Seyfried

Dr. Seyfried’s research program focuses on mechanisms by which metabolic therapy manages chronic diseases such as epilepsy, neurodegenerative lipid storage diseases, and cancer. The metabolic therapies include caloric restriction, fasting, and ketogenic diets.

Dr. Seyfried’s approach is based on the idea that compensatory metabolic pathways are capable of modifying the pathogenesis of complex diseases. Global shifts in metabolic environment can neutralize molecular pathology. In the case of cancer, these therapies target and kill tumor cells while enhancing the physiological health of normal cells.

The neurochemical and genetic mechanisms of these phenomena are under investigation in novel animal models and include the processes of inflammation, cellular physiology, angiogenesis, and lipid biochemistry.

Dr. Seyfried published a groundbreaking treatise entitled, Cancer as a Metabolic Disease: On the Origin, Management, and Prevention of Cancer (Wiley, 1st ed., 2012). The treatise provides extensive information showing that cancer can be best defined as a mitochondrial metabolic disease rather than as a genetic disease.

This new concept has implications for the development of new non-toxic cancer therapies including the ketogenic diet. Experts in the cancer research field have praised this comprehensive study as one of science’s hottest topics. Amazon customer reviews.

Of the 10 pages of reviews, about 75% are 5 Stars. *****. That is extremely good for a high end medical book which requires significant neurons firing to make headway.

I have to say a little to the negative reviewers. First of all, it is well known that one can’t please everyone and no matter how good the message there are some humans who will find something to bitch about no matter who you are or what you are saying. Look what happened to Jesus Christ, the most perfect Man who ever lived.

As usual, there are always a few panning the book for all the usual reasons – like “It’s too expensive“,, “He is just pushing his diet“, “I didn’t think of this first, Oh Wah!” and so on. In this case I suspect that virtually all the negative reviews are from people who were looking for an authority which agreed with them, or were looking for a quick and easy fix for their particular problem.

For all those reviewers you have the whole established medical paradigm to fall back on. Hope that works for you. I would bet a good Keto meal that most of these nay-sayers never actually read the book all the way through but gave up as soon as the going got tough.

But death is a tough route … cancer sucks BIG TIME … so go with your feelings and see if the genetic cancer model, and radiation, and chemo works for you … who knows, you might get lucky and be cured without having to change your thinking.

I quote just one review here:

*****

“Cancer is an illness that directly or indirectly affects most people at one time or another. Thus, my interest in this book was motivated by a desire to learn more about recent advances in the treatment of the disease and the success that has been achieved especially in recent years with the well chronicled revolution in “precision medicine” and its underlying application of gene therapy.

However, I was stunned and somewhat disheartened to learn of the slow rate of progress in the treatment of cancer in spite of the monumental financial investment and the efforts of so many scientists and other professionals in universities, medical schools, and in the pharmaceutical industry.

As so powerfully and effectively described by the author of this book, slow progress in the “war on cancer” lies not only in the complexity of the disease itself, but also, and perhaps more importantly, on the non-universal recognition of some of the most basic and fundamental aspects of the cause of cancer.

The author takes the position that cancer is a metabolic disease, following up on the pioneering research of Nobel laureate, Dr. Otto Warburg. Seyfried’s review of the Warburg’s work is clear and compelling, even to a non-specialist, although a web search from time to time is helpful to fully grasp some of the more sophisticated concepts in biology.

The presentation and review of the author’s research as well as that of many other leading scientists provides a logical and clearly written account of the impressive body of data that continue to give validity to the “Warburg theory”. Accordingly, metabolic processes in normal and abnormal (cancerous) cells are compared with an emphasis on realistic models based largely on animal studies.

Supporting data are illustrated by figures and images that convincingly implicate metabolic dysfunction and respiratory insufficiency as the essential cause of cancer. Importantly, Seyfried then makes the strong case that it is the metabolic dysfunction that induces gene modification, now commonly recognized in virtually all cancers.

The important take home message, however, is that it is the metabolic dysfunction of the cell that drives genetic modifications-not the other way around. This is profoundly important with far reaching implications, especially for the management and prevention of cancer.

Indeed, in light of these results, it is a mystery to this reviewer why there is presently such universal focus on the genome in the development of drugs to treat what appears to be a metabolic disease. This seems to be a case of the tail wagging the dog, which would be OK, if the stakes were not so high for so many.

The last four to five chapters of the book emphasize the broader aspects of metabolic dysfunction in cancer and how an appreciation of this can lead to more humane treatments than presently is the case. The so-called “standard of care” overwhelmingly used at present emphasizes the application of poisonous drugs and toxic doses of radiation, which, as noted by the author, often engenders in patients a fear that rivals that of the disease itself.

In chapter 20 the author details the beneficial and therapeutic effects in cancer treatment of the ketogenic diet that takes full advantage of strategies logically linked to the scientific principals developed throughout the book.

I strongly recommend this book to anyone interested in the origin and treatment of cancer. It is a challenging book, but one that rewards the reader with knowledge and contemplation about one of the great plagues in modern society with every turn of the page.

*****

Well, I am interested, and I went ahead and bought the book … yes, $120.00 Canadian might seem to some to be a little steep but often in life one gets what one has paid for. I have spent at least that much and more on a good night out on the town so in the big picture it is really chump change.

I will keep you posted on how I feel about this area of research after I have read the book,  or maybe sooner if it goes slower than I expect.

Cheers

Joe

You can always find an upside even in a bad situation. Never Give Up, Never Give Up, Never Give Up!

 

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Life in a small town

Salt … Who Knew?

“Àki”, Rodrigo Rodriguez, from the album “Inner Thoughts” (2006)

So, Jason Fung has cured my Type 2 diabetes. and helped me lose about 30 pounds, and you can see all the links to my previous posts on the Fasting Diet here.

Now I have come across another researcher who is blazing a wide swath of destruction through another colossal medical boondoggle, that is the crusade against salt on the part of established medical and dietary authority. At first blush it seems they are as out to lunch about salt as they have been about fat and the other sacred cows of modern dietary guidelines such as are found in the Canada Food Guide.

James J. DiNicolantonio, Pharm. D

James J. DiNicolantonio, Pharm. D

James J. DiNicolantonio, Pharm. D., is a respected cardiovascular research scientist, doctor of pharmacy at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Missouri, and the associate editor of British Medical Journal’s (BMJ) Open Heart.

He is the author or coauthor of approximately 200 publications in medical literature. His research has been featured in The New York Times, ABC’s Good Morning America, TIME, Fox News, U.S. News and World Report, Yahoo! Health, BBC News, Daily Mail, Forbes, National Public Radio, and Men’s Health, among others.

His new book, The Salt Fixis sure to change the national conversation about this historically treasured substance. The Salt Fix elegantly and accessibly weaves the research into a fascinating new understanding of salt’s essential role in your health and what happens when you aren’t getting enough—with far-reaching, even heart-stopping, implications.

We’ve all heard the recommendation: eat no more than a teaspoon of salt a day for a healthy heart. But there’s one big problem with this: the vast majority of us don’t need to eat low-salt diets. In fact, for most of us, more salt would be better for our health, rather than less. (Not to mention, much tastier.)

Now, Dr. James DiNicolantonio reveals the incredible, often baffling story of how salt became unfairly demonized—a never-before-told, century-spanning drama of competing egos and interests.

Robb Wolf

Robb Wolf

Not only have we gotten it wrong, we’ve gotten it exactly backwards: eating more salt can help protect you from a host of ailments, including internal starvation, insulin resistance, diabetes, and even heart disease. (The real culprit? Another white crystal—sugar.)  Some reviewers (whom I have read) follow:

“For decades, doctors and mainstream medicine have recommended that you lower your salt intake, but in this well-researched and surprising book, Dr. DiNicolantonio explains why this seemingly well-informed advice is, in fact, wrong. The Salt Fix provides the advice and the program you need to add back the salt and in the process improve your health and your waistline.” Robb Wolf, New York Times bestselling author of The Paleo Solution and Wired to Eat

“The medical profession has done a disservice to millions of people by misleading them into thinking they need to avoid salt in their diets. Our blood is salty; our tissue fluids are salty; we need salt to thrive.

In The Salt Fix, Dr. DiNicolantonio charts the ill-begotten thinking that got us to this sorry state of almost universal salt avoidance, and imparts invaluable scientifically-sound advice for adding this healthful substance back into your diet.  Dr. DiNicolantonio’s book will help you improve your health by actually adding salt back into your favorite foods.” Michael R. Eades, M.D., New York Times bestselling author of Protein Power.

And of course, “The Keto Dudes have an episode on the salt problem. More to follow as I continue to investigate a discovery which somehow doesn’t surprise me even a little bit…

Cheers

Joe

DIE! you scurvy salt thief

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