Life in a small town

Assumptions … onward from August 25th …

Lately I have been spending a lot more time thinking about my moral life in Christ and a lot less time writing. On August 25th I posted thus: “So, imagine a universe where authority can be wrong. Sometimes, a person in authority can be mistaken. A person who believes a lie, and who repeats the lie, does not do so out of malicious intent! And yet, he is repeating a lie! Sometimes people and authorities believe things that are later proven to be untrue and they act on those things with a clear conscience because it’s “for our own good”. If you forced these folks to take a lie detector test they would pass because they actually do not know it is a lie.

There are books, books written as recently as a few years years ago, books you can still find in the library, which include untruths. Did those writers lie to you? No, they’d told the truth, as they’d known it. But future generations discovered that their concept of the truth had been very limited, and knowledge is still advancing. And that is just the mild form of misinformation.”

And at the time I wrote this I was thinking in terms of various secular authorities and governing bodies and so on, but I realized, thinking about this, after finishing my routine morning meditation, and going about my daily duties, that the “wrong authority” meme applies equally well to the popular image of “religion” as delusional, superstitious, and as some Communist “thinkers” have expressed: “The Opiate of the Masses”.

And I also thought about some popular notions regarding “the Inquisition”, “Burn the Witch!”, and so on including categorizing “The Crusades” as militaristic aggression on the part of European culture against “innocent” Muslim nations, all of which are frequently cited as “reasonable proof” that religion, and more specifically Christian or even Catholic religion is a load of mind control malarkey.

Our accepted “authorities” have done a pretty good job of selling these mis-truths about religion to the general proletariat in the interest of maintaining control and rationalizing their social policy choices and directions and coincidentally, their power base. So, as previously posted “imagine a universe where authority can be wrong“. Imagine a situation where all those “assumptions” about Christianity are just … well … wrong. Imagine.

So I am just going to quote from my meditation book … a message shining a light on what Christianity is … in reality …:

“1. Everyone has some burden, more or less heavy, to bear: physical or moral weakness, the press of duties and responsibilities, fatigue or other troubles which weigh on his shoulders. Everyone feels the need of a friendly hand to help him carry this weight. This hand should be held out to him in fraternal charity, which for the love of GOD, knows how to be all things to all men. “Bear ye one another’s burdens, and so you shall fulfill the law of Christ” (St. Paul, Gal 6,2)

A Christian knows that he  is not isolated, but is a member of a unique body, the Mystical Body of Christ. “So we being many, are one body in Christ, and every one members one of another” (St. Paul, Rom 12,5). This knowledge of his solidarity with the brethren makes a Christian live, not enclosed in the tiny circle of his own interests, but with his heart open to the needs and interests of others. The mystery of our incorporation in Christ is more than an individual fact; by its very nature, it is a social fact. Incorporation in Christ by grace and charity connotes reciprocal incorporation among brethren, like branches of a vine, which, sprung from the same stock, are so closely united one to another that they live, grow, and develop together.

Love for Christ is the vital expression of our union with Him; the closer this union becomes, the more our love increases; so too, fraternal charity is the vital expression of our reciprocal union with the brethren in Christ, to such a point that if this charity were not living and operative, we would have to say that our union in Christ and with Christ is very weak or even absolutely null.” (Fr. Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen, O.C.D.  from the book “Divine Intimacy” meditations on the interior life for every day of the liturgical year pp 778)

That’s definitely not the popular image of a “Catholic”. The world “KNOWS” that Catholics are the real bad guys… hmmm.

Enough for now … more in the next post and a parting jest:

 

Cheers

Joe

 

 

 

 

 

 

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