Life in a small town

Palm Sunday … and anti-religious bigotry … A New “Reformation”?

So tomorrow is the first Palm Sunday of my life that the churches are all closed, ostensibly because of the Red Flu outbreak. Interesting background story to that global closure … Jews, Protestants, Catholics, all the meek, mild “sheep”, all worship meetings, all “Verboten”. This is a real cross.

A blogger I read regularly posted this: “As I was writing this tonight, I received a text from a friend. A priest he knows said that, “as an organization, if the Church(s?) didn’t follow Covid-19 protocols, they could be fined $500,000. Instant bankruptcy. And people in the community,” he said, “are taking pictures & watching.”  But not a peep out of the “independent” journalistic media anywhere. So much for integrity.

The rest of the heathen masses don’t matter much because they only go to sports events and parties, bars, restaurants, and nightclubs, which are easy to close. We already have total control of their  drugged out “minds” via social media. Haven’t heard much about the Muslims though … seems the “authorities” all start wetting their collective panties whenever they have to face Muslims. How did we end up here?

BUT!  and it’s a huge BUT … We have a golden God given opportunity to LOVE. Love like never before as humans. This brief opportunity we have before us right now is to pray for the conversion of those who have rejected God’s Love in pursuit of their worship of self, of the goods of this world, now showing to be rather thread-bare in the face of the Red Flu.

We are being given an opportunity not to act like the elder brother in that parable who is bitter toward his prodigal brother and would prefer justice. No, let us fast and pray that the lost will be found and the blind may see again!

I don’t know why I am moved to say this, but I feel such compassion right now for artists, and writers, and actors, and entertainers, and yes, even all the talking heads and experts so in love with their own opinions.

I want them to know, if any are reading this, that you are loved with an eternal love. That God knew you before He formed you in your mother’s womb, and knew that you would be one of the survivors. That God the Father wants to wrap you in His enormous tender arms. Soon, the masks and facades will all fall away and God is going to ask not who you were, but WHO ARE YOU?

To me, what’s my take-away from all this … We can see all around us the results of fear, lack of trust, in God and in our neighbour, and not a little malice in the ones who believe that we need a lot less humans in this world, that we are “overpopulated” and could do with a couple of million deaths from the Red Flu, especially since it mostly kills the old and the useless.

Couldn’t happen here, right? But it doesn’t take many little gestapo informers to put every one of us in hiding and on notice that we better conform. How many of us, as a parish community, could afford a half a million dollars fine on top of all the other debts and expenses our parishes face every week, because we were “reported by our neighbours” for gathering to worship God.

The buildings would all be closed and all the assets seized, very much as they were in all the Reformation countries and especially in the most successful “Reformation” in England 500 years ago.  We have been here before … “The Reformation” was actually one big asset grab by the Civil authorities to further their “Worldly Agenda”.

And just as in the England of the Reformation, just a little bit of authoritarian health care attention and we could see religious people being reduced to 1 or 2 percent of the population within a few weeks or months and relegated to a footnote in history. The Father of Lies is having a little victory celebration, I think.

So what’s next … soon will we have to wear a little Star of David patch or a little Cross on our chest, or even a Crescent … well, maybe not the Islamics because all the usual heroes are even more terrified of Muslims than they are of the Red Flu. I have heard that the Muslims are still meeting for worship. “Je Suis Charlie”, right?

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One Bishop is speaking out:  read the full interview at the site of the post, or read the highlights here:

ROME, March 27, 2020 — As the coronavirus continues to spread, Bishop Athanasius Schneider has urged priests to imitate Jesus the Good Shepherd and, for the sake of souls, even disobey the unjust orders of bishops whom he says are now behaving more like “civil bureaucrats” than “shepherds.”

In a new interview on the Church’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic (see full text below), the auxiliary bishop of Saint Mary in Astana, Kazakhstan, said he believes the majority of Catholic bishops reacted “precipitously and out of panic in prohibiting all public Masses.” The decision to close churches, he said, is “even more incomprehensible.”

“As long as supermarkets are open and accessible, and as long as people have access to public transportation, one cannot see a plausible reason for banning people from assisting at Holy Mass in a church,” Bishop Schneider said. “One can guarantee in churches the same and even better hygienic protective measures.”

He said the Church’s handling of the coronavirus epidemic has revealed a “loss of supernatural vision” particularly among the hierarchy — some of whom, he noted, despite their vigilance to combat COVID-19, have “tranquilly allowed the poison virus of heretical teachings and practices to spread among their flock.”

Bishop Schneider urged priests to remember that they are “first and foremost shepherds of immortal souls,” who are called by their priestly vocation to lay down their lives for the sheep. Amid the coronavirus pandemic, he said priests must “observe all the necessary health precautions” but also “be extremely creative” in finding ways to celebrate Holy Mass and provide the sacraments, even for a small group of the faithful. “Such was the pastoral behavior of all confessor and martyr priests in the time of persecution,” said the bishop, whose early years were spent in the Soviet underground church.

In some cases, he said, the care of souls might necessitate a priest disobeying the unjust order of his bishop. “If a priest is prohibited by an ecclesial authority from going to visit the sick and dying, he cannot obey. Such a prohibition is an abuse of power. Christ did not give a bishop the power to forbid visiting the sick and dying.”

Recalling the heroic example of the sixteenth-century cardinal archbishop of Milan, St. Charles Borromeo (1538-1584), who braved a plague undaunted in order to serve the spiritual needs of its victims, Bishop Schneider said “a true priest will do everything he can to visit a dying person.”

Asked if he believes the coronavirus pandemic is a form of divine retribution for the Pachamama events held inside the Vatican during the October 2019 Amazon Synod, the bishop said that while he does not have “certainty” that these events are related, the idea is “not far-fetched.”

“The cultic veneration of the pagan idol of Pachamama inside the Vatican, with the approval of the Pope, was to be sure a great sin of infidelity to the First Commandment of the Decalogue, it was an abomination,” he said. But he added that “such acts of idolatry were the culmination of a series of other acts of infidelity to the safeguarding of the divine deposit of Faith by many high-ranking members of the Church’s hierarchy in past decades.”

Recalling the Lord’s threat of punishment and call to repentance, directed to bishops in the Book of Revelation (cf. 2:14-16), Bishop Schneider said he is convinced that “Christ would repeat the same words to Pope Francis and to the other bishops” who allowed the veneration of the Pachamama in the Vatican and who “implicitly approved sexual relationships outside a valid marriage” by allowing “divorced and remarried” Catholics who are sexually active to receive Holy Communion.

In the interview on the Church’s response to the coronavirus, Bishop Schneider has also asserted that the uniqueness and severity of the ban on public Masses and sacramental Communion beckons Catholics to consider its “deeper meaning.”  

For more than fifty years, he observed, the Eucharistic presence of Jesus Christ has been “trivialized” and even “desecrated” through the practice of Communion in the hand and the introduction of “protestantizing elements” in the Roman liturgy.

“Now,” he said, “the Lord has intervened and deprived almost all the faithful of assisting at Holy Mass and sacramentally receiving Holy Communion. The innocent and the guilty are enduring this tribulation together, since in the mystery of the Church all are mutually united as members.”

To make restitution to God, he said the Pope and bishops ought urgently to carry out a public act of reparation in Rome “for sins against the Holy Eucharist” once the coronavirus pandemic is brought under control. He also said the Pope should issue concrete norms inviting the entire Church to “turn toward the Lord” in the liturgy and “forbid the practice of Communion in the hand.”

“The Church,” he said, “cannot continue unpunished to treat the Holy of Holies in the little sacred Host in such a minimalistic and unsafe manner.”

*****

So, in conclusion,  just a simple hymn from 1795, words by John Tay­lor, in Se­lec­tion of Hymns for So­cial Wor­ship, by Will­iam En­field (Nor­wich, Eng­land: 1795), num­ber 149. The first verse in the text be­low was origin­al­ly the last verse. The 1795 text be­gan, God of mer­cy, God of love.

Music is by Sey­mour from the op­e­ra Ob­er­on, by Carl M. von We­ber, 1826. Hen­ry W. Grea­tor­ex pub­lished it as a hymn tune in 1851.

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God of mercy! God of grace!
Hear our sad, repentant songs.
O restore Thy suppliant race,
Thou to whom our praise belongs!

Deep regret for follies past,
Talents wasted, time misspent;
Hearts debased by worldly cares,
Thankless for the blessings lent.

Foolish fears and fond desires,
Vain regrets for things as vain:
Lips too seldom taught to praise,
Oft to murmur and complain.

These, and every secret fault,
Filled with grief and shame, we own.
Humbled at Thy feet we lie,
Seeking pardon from Thy throne.

*****

Cheers

Joe

Just a little rough patch

Just going through a rough patch, The Faith Is Strong!

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Amoris Laetitia and Auschwitz …

Twilight And Shadow”, Howard Shore, from “Lord Of The Rings

A couple of posts ago I posted a long article on the moral controversy surrounding the subject apostolic exhortation by Pope Francis. This post is another where the writer has articulately pointed out the significant moral equivalencies between the Pope’s memo and the Nazi program of extermination – the final Solution.

Go there. or read it here, or if you roll that way, just ignore it, along with abortion and euthanasia and all the other nice progressive amoral planks of our modern progressive society. Your call.

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According to AL, a conscience may “recognize that a a given situation does not correspond objectively to the demands of the Gospel” but sees “with a certain moral security … what for now is the most generous response”.

Let us examine how this moral principle might apply in situations of organised and industrialised genocide. A man involved in the extermination of Jewry, for example … if he were to decline to collaborate in any more murders, not only might he be subjected to discriminatory responses, but his family also might suffer grievously. His marriage might suffer!

Is he, perhaps, required by the Bergoglian moral principle of “what is for now the most generous response” to try, gradually so as not to be noticed, to reduce the number of Jews whom he kills each day? Or might Bergoglianism mean that he should do his very best to see that they die less painfully? Or should he attempt, again without drawing too much attention to himself, so to work the system that in three months time he gets transferred to duties which involve him less directly in extermination … like, for example, harmlessly organising the train schedules?

I am aware that my questions lay me wide open to an accusation that I am either an unbalanced crank in making an equivalence between well-mannered habitual adultery among the nice, if rather gleefully rutting, German middle-classes, and genocide; or ‘antisemitic’ for illustrating a moral priple by talking so calmly about something as vile as what Nazi Germany did to the Jews.

It is my view that such an accusation by such an interlocutor would in fact amount to an admission that Adultery is not really sinful … that it is, well, perhaps not technically in accordance, quite, with the book of rules, but it is not really wrong. Cardinal Coccopalmerio has in fact said something rather like this.

It is also my view that a mortal sin is a mortal sin is a mortal sin is a mortal sin. And Mortal Sin is the area into which, like several fair-sized and unstable bulls in a very tiny china shop, Bergoglio and his cronies have strayed. And by sanctioning what Fr Aidan Nichols has neatly called “tolerated concubinage”, I do not think they will bring a single murdered Jew back to life or even save a single victim in future genocides. In fact, quite the contrary. Do we save lives … or marriages … by chipping away at the Decalogue, or by shoring it up when it comes under threat?

A person, you tell me, may well know a rule yet be in a concrete situation which does not allow him or her to act differently. So …. if this does not also apply within genocidal situations, where can it apply?

A person’s long involvement, you tell me, in sinful actions may well so habituate him to those actions that the subjective sinfulness, as AL claims, is radically diminished … yes; I happen to agree with you there, and, like all confessors, I am mindful of this when I sit with my ear against the grill. But you won’t forget, will you, that somebody who has been killing Jews for a couple of years might also well be in such a condition. And the tribunals which judged War Criminals after 1945 don’t seem to have taken this laudable casuistic principle into their jurisprudence.

Bergoglio’s ‘jesuitical’ campaign to circumvent Veritatis splendor paragraph 80, as well as Familiaris consortio, is both a moral and an ecclesial disaster. If Bergoglian ‘moral principles’ prevail, then, as Fr Aidan Nichols has accurately put it, “no area of Christian morality can remain unscathed“.

*****

Cheers

Joe

Now don’t you dare step out of line my precious … we will get to you in good time. And while you are waiting please visit https://bccla.org/our-work/blog/lamb/

There is ALWAYS a way to rationalize evil in our progressive nation.

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