Life in a small town

Wisdom … and the getting of … we are still waiting for the book … so coat-tails again.

Dr. Thomas N. Seyfried

Dr. Thomas N. Seyfried

Several posts ago I mentioned Dr. Seyfried’s research program. I said I would keep you all posted on how I feel about Dr. Seyfried’s area of research after I have read his book,  or maybe sooner if it goes slower than I expect.

Dr. Seyfried’s research program is focused on the mechanisms by which metabolic therapy manages chronic diseases such as epilepsy, neurodegenerative lipid storage diseases, and cancer. The metabolic therapies include caloric restriction, fasting, and ketogenic diets.

I also mentioned that, I was interested enough that I went ahead and bought the book … yes, $120.00 Canadian might seem to some to be a little steep but often in life one gets what one has paid for. I have spent at least that much and more on a good night out on the town so in the big picture it is really chump change.

2 Keto Dudes

2 Keto Dudes

But it is taking a while to arrive, and thus no progress reading up on this area to date. So in the interim, I give you the 2 Keto Dudes.

The following is from their podcast site at: http://2ketodudes.com/  but it is probably best to visit their site and read and listen to everything they have put up there …

The Science (behind Keto)

Our bodies run on two primary fuels: glucose and fatty acids.

It’s kind of like we have a car with an engine that can run on either gasoline or diesel. We fuel up by eating food. If we eat food containing sugars and starches (carbohydrates) we convert those quickly into glucose and we run as glucose burners. All the cells in our bodies can turn this glucose into energy.

This is why it’s sometimes called our primary fuel. If we eat more glucose than we need for immediate exercise requirements, our livers sweep up the extra glucose and turn it into saturated fat, and sends this (and any fat we have eaten) off to our fat cells to be stored for lean times.

If we don’t eat any carbs and instead eat fat (and moderate protein) most of our cells can easily burn the fatty acids for energy. It could be the fat in our food but it could also be fat that we have stored in case food is ever scarce.

This state is called nutritional ketosis. We often go into ketosis during sleep (if we haven’t eaten a late dinner), and of course anyone doing a fast is running their fat burning engine.

Some cells in the body (and the most metabolically active organ – the brain) can’t burn fatty acids, but your brain can use ketones. These are small water soluble molecules that you make as a by product of metabolizing fats.

Luckily your liver makes glucose even when you don’t eat any carbohydrates, and by a quirk of fate, when it is making glucose for your brain it is also pumping out a lot of ketones.

We evolved to be predominantly fat burners for 11 months of the year. At the end of summer (when ripe fruit is available) we became predominantly glucose burners. We are good at adapting from one mode to the next, although it can take a few weeks for the machinery of fat burning to spin up to full efficiency and put our glucose burning into idle.

Once you are adapted to burning fat (keto-adaptation) and you start eating carbohydrates again, in a few weeks your glucose burning metabolism will be back up at full speed.

In our modern world, however, we are burning glucose all year round, 6 meals a day. Our bodies have forgotten how to burn fat. We just store it and never get a chance to burn it.

Some of us have become so metabolically deranged working our glucose metabolism 24/7 365 days a year that our mechanism for safely metabolising glucose has become broken – and that is how we got type 2 diabetes.

The Ketogenic diet addresses this by forcing your metabolism to predominantly burn fat, restricting your dietary carbohydrates, and relying on your liver to make all the glucose and ketones your brain needs. Most of the rest of your body burns fatty acids directly for energy.

When you give your body fat, it becomes good at burning fat! When you give your body glucose, it becomes good at storing fat!

But what about the studies that show correlation between fat intake and heart disease? If you look carefully, study after study shows that increasing fat intake while eating more than 50 grams of carbohydrates a day will indeed increase heart disease and all that goes with it. These studies fail to remove the carbohydrates!

Some people are good at switching from one mode to the next. Type 2 diabetics, however, have a broken metabolism for dealing with glucose, so when we eat carbohydrates we get progressively worse glucose control and consequently get sicker over decades.

We can, however, hack our body into being full time fat burners. This hack not only allows us to maintain safe glucose levels (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19099589), with less medication (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25071075), but improves many of our biomarkers of disease.

If we additionally choose to use this hack to also lose weight it preserves more of our our resting energy expenditure (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1199154) and over time if we have intervened early enough can allow us to reverse the progression of type 2 diabetes (http://www.yorku.ca/mriddell/documents/istype2reversible.pdf).

This dietary strategy is still something that Diabetes Associations around the world are only just now looking at, and Dietetic associations are firmly opposed to, as it is not a modest tweak of their established food pyramid, but a complete upending of it.

There are political issues as well. The USDA has a conflict of interest when it comes to dietary guidelines. That said, the ketogenic diet is quickly becoming the first approach in diabetes management among progressive medical specialists (http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(14)00332-3/pdf).

The bottom line for us is that following the low fat model for the past 40 years has made us fatter and sicker. In 2012 some 52% of US adults – according to the projections in this study (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2434682) – were either diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (9.1%), or undiagnosed type 2 diabetics (5.2%), or they had a condition called prediabetes, meaning they were metabolically deranged but not quite at diabetic levels (38%).

So, it is no longer just some of us. Most of us are in trouble. That is why we’re 2 keto dudes, and why we’re doing this podcast.

*****

So enjoy the ride – stop with the wheat, the bread, the sweet (continental?) breakfasts, the coffee break donut binge, you know, all that stuff that made us sick by doing what we were told. Love the fat, eat the fat, get healthy!

Cheers

Joe

We weren’t designed to live on fast food and sugar … 

Standard
Life in a small town

Fasting … Part Two …

“En Priere”, Bill Douglas, from the album “Kaleidoscope”, (1993)

001-a-fung-5x7-webWell, the Jason Fung diet effort continues. I started on January 17th and immediately proceeded to the 24 hour fast, that is, only eating supper every 24 hours.

I watched my blood sugar start coming down, my energy picked up and I quickly moved into ketosis.  By day 6, I had decided to go to a complete fast, no solid meals, just lots of water, coffee, and chicken and beef broth. After 7 days of liquid only fasting I decided to break the fast and go back to eating supper every day.

At that point I had been fasting for a total of 13 days counting both the 24 hour fasts and the 7 day total fast. I was in heavy ketosis, with ketone bodies at 16 mmol/l, my blood sugar and come down as far as 8 mmol/l, I had dropped 6 pounds, I had stopped all diabetes medications and I felt good.

The only hard part was day 2 during which I was sorely tempted to just abandon it all. I must have visited the fridge at least 25 times that day and still managed to resist temptation.  Anyway, yesterday I started with three small snacks spaced over the day and finished up with a regular supper of steak, scalloped potatoes and string peas.

This morning I find my blood sugar has shot up to 16.8, which on thinking about it is not really a surprise since it is always higher in the morning. I am still in moderate ketosis and I am no longer taking any meds for diabetes.

Yes, I ate a bunch of carbs last night for supper and they are simply the worst for boosting blood sugar. So we will check every four hours and see how the sugars come down today and how I feel going forward.

I didn’t gain any weight but it is definitely back to the no carbs, one high fat high protein meal and the rest broth and coffee and lots of water. I am thinking that I will repeat the cycle I just went through with 6 24 hour fasts followed by 7 consecutive fast days and see where we are then.

So here we go again, and I hope things are easier on day two this time, but it will probably not be easier since I will be going through the same process again. I will keep posting as things develop.

Cheers

Joe

001-the-long-defeatYou know Frodo, hobbits are really not designed for fasting. We haven’t had our Elevenses or Tea in weeks,  and I am getting really sick of waybread …

Standard