Life in a small town

The Resurrection Of Our Lord

This could have been a long and involved post but N.T. Wright wrote over 800 pages on this topic and I think I will simply refer those interested to his work and stick to what this means to me and why I have come to believe what I believe. First, it is absolutely clear to me at this stage that All of Christianity stands or falls on the reality of the Resurrection. Either Christ was/is GOD the Son and the Resurrection is a real event as we believe, and everything He taught is true and is as He says:

Jesus Christ, ca 30AD

1Let not your heart be troubled. You believe in God: believe also in me. 2In my Father’s house there are many mansions. If not, I would have told you: because I go to prepare a place for you. 3And if I shall go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself: that where I am, you also may be. 4And whither I go you know: and the way you know.

5Thomas saith to him: Lord, we know not whither thou goest. And how can we know the way? 6Jesus saith to him: I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No man cometh to the Father, but by me.

7If you had known me, you would without doubt have known my Father also: and from henceforth you shall know him. And you have seen him.

8Philip saith to him: Lord, shew us the Father; and it is enough for us. 9Jesus saith to him: Have I been so long a time with you and have you not known me? Philip, he that seeth me seeth the Father also. How sayest thou: Shew us the Father? 10Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father in me? The words that I speak to you, I speak not of myself. But the Father who abideth in me, he doth the works. 11Believe you not that I am in the Father and the Father in me? 12Otherwise believe for the very works’ sake.

Amen, amen, I say to you, he that believeth in me, the works that I do, he also shall do: and greater than these shall he do. 13Because I go to the Father: and whatsoever you shall ask the Father in my name, that will I do: that the Father may be glorified in the Son. 14If you shall ask me any thing in my name, that I will do.” (John 14:1-14)

George Soros, 2012

Or, Christ was/is NOT GOD the Son and the Resurrection is not a real event as we believe, but rather some foundational myth of just another religion, and everything He taught is a lie.

There is no moral compass and all truth, good, evil, joy and suffering are simply some relativistic opinion of one or another charismatic person, more or less good according to their own judgement and the judgement of their particular followers.

In this regime, this philosophy, there is no moral difference no valid way to judge what are right actions and results between, for example, those who sought to save and protect the Jewish and Christian victims of the Nazi holocaust, and the bureaucrats and camp workers and soldiers who set those policies and put the “Final Solution” into action.

All that we have is a difference of opinion between the followers of different sociopolitical points of view.

Kim Jong-un

In the society which does not believe in the Resurrection there are only differences of opinion and any and all means of forwarding one’s point of view are acceptable. Christians are just stupid suckers who deserve death or worse because they are “just too stupid to live”.

Might makes right, and outside of the Resurrection, that is the foundation of every belief system in history and really, anywhere on the planet today.

Our choice today is between North Korea and by implication China, and all the other totalitarian regimes making headlines today on the one hand, and the nominally “christian” west which has a history of “working for the good” but is currently in the throes of rapidly jettisoning that “old fashioned baggage” and rapidly moving towards the Korean model by way of Franco-European style socialism.

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin (front, R), Chinese President Xi Jinping (front, L), his wife Peng Liyuan (2nd row, L), and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (2nd row, R), arrive for a gala show to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War Two, in Beijing, China, September 3, 2015. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

We are proudly living in the derelict castle of our past and using up the stores of our patrimony without providing anything or creating anything new for the future generation. All the while we prance about like drama students pretending that we wrote the play.

This is one of those utterly simple binary choices between two clearly, radically even, different paths of existence and the choice hinges on belief that there is a Good that is desirable and attainable by all men, or on a belief that there is no Good, that all choices are relative and equally meritorious, what I have previously referred to as “the Mystical Body of Christ vs The Mystical Body of Anti-Christ”.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks with the media in the foyer of the House of Commons following the release of an ethics report in Ottawa on Wednesday December 20, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld ORG XMIT: ajw105

The latter path appears to be the predominant direction of our modern society, the clear choice, the politically correct mindset of the Luciferian Left, our progressive leadership and the vast government network of functionaries and minions who are engaged in  forwarding the agenda of the latest “Final Solution”, as well as those who they claim to “serve” as in “public service”.

We find ourselves living our lives in a perfect classroom experiment involving Christ’s instruction about “loving our enemies”. If the delineation between the sides of this choice is not immediately clear then ask yourself “Why is the Tides Foundation Canada one of the major supporters of the Liberal Party of Canada?”

Who is at the top of the food chain in the Tides foundation? What’s in it for them? And why is Pope Francis’s administration lining up in lock step all across the spectrum with the global agenda of George Soros?

Don’t take my word for it … do your own digging … it’s all out there in the public domain.

I have been reading “Resurrection of the Son of God V3: Christian Origins and the Question of God”, by N. T. Wright. Fortress Press.  I quote from a couple of reviewers: “‘A monumental achievement in its scope, depth, and execution … a landmark in scholarly studies of the resurrection.’ Gerald O ’ Collins, The Tablet.

and

‘The most monumental defence of the Easter heritage in decades … The Resurrection of the Son of God marches through a clearly organized case that confronts every major doubt about Easter, ancient and modern.’ Richard N. Ostling, Associated Press.

For me, this is indeed “monumental”, the best book about the Resurrection I have ever had the pleasure to read. To end this post I am going to quote from the Preface. I have edited and slightly re-arranged the paragraph order and structure into bite sized bits which I find easier to read online but the thoughts and words are all N.T. Wright.

… in order to determine what happened on one particular day nearly two thousand years ago we find ourselves obliged to call and cross-examine a wide variety of witnesses, some of whom are simultaneously being questioned by advocates of other answers to the question.

The debate has frequently been bedevilled by oversimplifications, and to avoid this we shall have to set things out reasonably fully. Even so, there is no space for a full-scale history of research on the subject. I have chosen certain conversation partners, and regret that there was no room for more. My impression from reading the literature is that the primary sources themselves are not well enough known, or carefully enough studied.

The pilgrim who visits the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem faces several puzzles. Is this after all the place where Jesus of Nazareth was crucified and buried? Why is it inside the city walls, not outside as one had supposed? How does the present building relate to the original site? How did the place come to be so different from what the New Testament leads us to expect (a garden with a tomb in it, close to a hill called Golgotha)?

And, even supposing this is roughly the right place, is this the right spot? Is this rocky outcrop, now enclosed within an upstairs chapel, actually the top of Golgotha? Is this marble slab really where the dead Jesus was laid? Is this highly ornate shrine really the site of the tomb? And—a different sort of question, but a pressing one for many visitors—why are different groups of Christians still squabbling about who owns the place?

N.T. Wright, speaking at a conference in December 2007

These puzzles, though, do not noticeably affect the appeal of the place. Despite archaeological, historical and ecclesiastical squabbles, the church retains its evocative and spiritual power. Pilgrims still flock to it in their hundreds of thousands.

Some of them still question whether it all really happened. Did Jesus of Nazareth, they ask, really rise from the dead? Whether or not they realize it, they join a different throng on a different pilgrimage: the jostling, overheated crowd of historians investigating the strange reports of events at the tomb of Jesus on the third day following his execution.
Here they are confronted with a similar set of problems.

The story of Easter, like the church at its supposed location, has been demolished and reconstructed again and again over the years. The tantalizing narratives in the gospels are as puzzling to the reader as the building is to the visitor. How do they fit together, if at all?

What precisely happened? Which school of thought today, if any, is telling the story truly? Many have despaired of discovering what, if anything, happened on the third day after Jesus’ crucifixion. Yet, despite perplexity and scepticism, billions of Christians around the world regularly repeat the original confession of Easter faith: on the third day after his execution, Jesus rose again.

So what did happen on Easter morning? This historical question, which is the central theme of the present book, is closely related to the question of why Christianity began, and why it took the shape it did.

N. T..Wright, “The Resurrection of the Son of God V3: Christian Origins and the Question of God” (pp. 3-4). Fortress Press.

Cheers

Joe

15. But if it seem evil to you to serve the Lord, you have your choice: choose this day that which pleaseth you, whom you would rather serve, whether the gods which your fathers served in Mesopotamia, or the gods of the Amorrhites, in whose land you dwell: but as for me and my house we will serve the Lord. (Joshua 24:15)

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Pen as Sword - Social Commentary

The Meaning of Language … communication?

Hamachidori“, by Ryutaro Hirota, played by Tokyo Kosei Wind Orchestra & Kazumasa Watanabe, from the album “Konomichi―Favorite Japanese Melodies (Japanese Melody Series)” (2004)

This is what -30 to -40 looks like …

So, what to say … first, a week ago this morning I slipped on the ice while walking in my driveway and fell on top of my leg as it folded under me, thus breaking my ankle.

That gentle “crunch” as I settled onto the ice was the give away but I chose to ignore it and “shake it off” and proceed to drive to my lunch date with an old service friend an hour and a half away and ignore the pain and tough it out in the interest of having a pleasant social gathering. Always push through and complete the mission, right?

On Wednesday last, my daughter insisted that I go to the hospital with her and get it X-rayed to prove that “It was only a serious sprain”. As life would have it, I was wrong … I admit it … and both my doctor and my daughter insisted that I repeat that several times. I. Was. Wrong. And the next day, Thursday, I found myself in surgery in the nearest city getting things repaired with plate and pins and screws.

Now, I sit in my favorite chair under doctor’s orders to keep the ankle elevated and to not put any weight on it until the next doctor’s appointment on March 14th. This is not only a pain in my ankle, but a right royal pain in my A__ since virtually everything I do including something as simple as visiting the washroom is hugely complicated by “Don’t you dare put ANY weight on that ankle!”.

Sigh … what is one to do.

Well, I guess this is one of those times in life when “tough” is another word for “stupid”. I guess I accept that. Most of what I do for work is something I can supervise over Facetime while others less crippled actually punch the keys, and the rest can just wait, I guess. My first wife of 40 years or so just laughs at me and says “I guess you will be giving up “Control” for Lent.”  I reply, “I guess that it’s nice to have “history”, to which she replies that she just wishes there wasn’t so much of it. Ha! spoken like a true loving wife.

Which brings me to the topic of “History”. What does one do when one can’t get out of the chair without enormous effort? Well, in my case I blog … This post may not be of much interest except amongst those of us who actually care about the details and precision and what things actually mean, as opposed to “just having a pleasant conversation over coffee with our friends”.

I like the term “praxis” meaning “that which people do habitually, characteristically and usually unreflectively“, as a wonderfully concise summary of our polite daily narrative. It gives me a nice handle on the state of action, conversation and thought, or the lack of same, in our social media society.

I have had an on-again, off-again, love/hate relationship with the use of our English language as a means of alleged “communications” for at least 40 years now.

After spending most of the 70’s as a practitioner (Rad Sea 251) of military communications, with it’s huge emphasis on precision and accuracy and warding off confusion, no matter the status of the current shit-storm, even to the extent of using a phonetic alphabet and spelling words and coordinates out in detail, I find myself still habitually thinking and speaking in annoyingly precise ways.

It is part of the very fiber of how I think and communicate. After all, the consequences of “getting it wrong” back then had a high probability of a Blue on Blue with predictably bad results. It is hard to shake those old life-saving habits.

I have found since then that the civilian world shows a distressing lack of precision and understanding of the meaning of common words, used every day, and in the communication of thoughts which when examined, have no relation whatsoever to the words in use to express the “feelings” of the speaker except perhaps in some vague syllabic sort of way, the more syllables the better.

The speaker(s) lack a basic understanding of what the words they use moment by moment actually mean in English is a never ending source of distress and misunderstanding. Should one raise any objection to this misuse of the language one is immediately vilified as a “pedant”, supposing that term exists in the speakers lexicon, and worse if the vocabulary is lacking.

“Red Dragonfly” by Kobudo, from the album “Ototabi”, (2013)

One very common example is the now popular “modern” journalistic use of and confusion of the words “honing” and “homing”, used interchangeably and it seems in use to mean a general sense of something bad coming that we can’t shake off, or of being on the right track depending on context. For just one example of many, at CNN :” Sources say Turkish investigators are honing in on a Saudi intelligence officer who allegedly led the torture and murder of “Washington Post” columnist Jamal Khashoggi.”

I sometimes question the writers in the comment column of their articles … in one recent occurrence, when asked about the confusion, “Do you mean “homing” as in “the missile is homing in to blow us to hell”, or do you mean “honing” as in “I am honing my blade in preparation to slitting your throat”? the latest writer I called on it got quite upset with me and not only refused to clarify the confusion but continued to repeat the obviously confusing misuse in subsequent writing. What is one to do? Pray, pray, and pray some more, I guess.

I am currently reading “The Resurrection of the Son of God V3: Christian Origins and the Question of God” by N.T. Wright, from “Fortress Press” . It is a joy to read, what I have in the past referred to as “Brain Candy”.

And Dr. Wright spends a significant part of the first 70 pages or so clarifying this exact problem of meaning and the need for clarity in the context of historical writing and theology …  and that same confusion is equally prevalent in daily social exchange and is arguably more important, since in the immediate sense, history is only important to historians.

This is so much fun that I am simply going to quote from the book and let the chips fall where they may (your mileage may vary):

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What, though, do we mean by ‘historical’?20 ‘History’ and its cognates have been used, within debates about Jesus and the resurrection, in at least five significantly different ways.

First, there is history as event. If we say something is ‘historical’ in this sense, it happened, whether or not we can know or prove that it happened. The death of the last pterodactyl is in that sense a historical event, even though no human witnessed it or wrote about it at the time, and we are very unlikely ever to discover when and where it took place. Similarly, we use the word ‘historical’ of persons or things, to indicate simply and solely that they existed.21

Second, there is history as significant event. Not all events are significant; history, it is often assumed, consists of the ones that are. The adjective that tends to go with this is ‘historic’; ‘a historic event’ is not simply an event that took place, but one whose occurrence carried momentous consequences. Likewise, a ‘historic’ person, building or object is one perceived to have had particular significance, not merely existence. Rudolf Bultmann, himself arguably a historic figure within the discipline of New Testament studies, famously used the adjective “geschichtlich” to convey this sense, over against “historisch” (sense 1).

Third, there is history as provable event. To say that something is ‘historical’ in this sense is to say not only that it happened but that we can demonstrate that it happened, on the analogy of mathematics or the so-called hard sciences. This is somewhat more controversial. To say ‘x may have happened, but we can’t prove it, so it isn’t really historical’ may not be self-contradictory, but is clearly operating with a more restricted sense of ‘history’ than some of the others.

Fourth, and quite different from the previous three, there is history as writing-about-events-in-the-past. To say that something is ‘historical’ in this sense is to say that it was written about, or perhaps could in principle have been written about. (This might even include ‘historical’ novels.) A variant on this, though an important one, is oral history; at a time when many regarded the spoken word as carrying more authority than the written, history as speaking-about-events-in-the-past is not to be sneezed at.22

Fifth and finally, a combination of (3) and (4) is often found precisely in discussions of Jesus: history as what modern historians can say about a topic. By ‘modern’ I mean ‘post-Enlightenment’, the period in which people have imagined some kind of analogy, even correlation, between history and the hard sciences. In this sense, ‘historical’ means not only that which can be demonstrated and written, but that which can be demonstrated and written within the post-Enlightenment worldview. This is what people have often had in mind when they have rejected ‘the historical Jesus’ (which hereby, of course, comes to mean ‘the Jesus that fits the Procrustean bed of a reductionist worldview’) in favour of ‘the Christ of faith’.23

Snow”, by Kobudo, from the album “Ototabi”  (2013).

N.T. Wright

Confusion between these senses has of course bedevilled this very debate about the so-called ‘historical Jesus’, the phrase being used by some to mean Jesus as he actually was (sense 1), by others to mean what was significant about Jesus (sense 2), by others to mean that which we can prove about Jesus, as opposed to that which we must either doubt or take on faith alone (sense 3); by others again to mean what people have written about Jesus (sense 4). Those who, as I mentioned, have taken the phrase in sense 5 have often rejected the Jesus not only of that sense but, apparently, of the previous four as well.24

“Jesus and the Victory of God” constitutes, in part, a response to this position. But we must now face one very specific, particular and in some senses peculiar case of the problem. In what sense, if any, can Jesus’ resurrection be spoken of as ‘historical’?

Second, how did people in Jesus’ day, both Gentiles and Jews, think and speak about the dead and their future destiny? In particular, what if anything did the word ‘resurrection’ (anastasis and its cognates, and the verb egeiro and its cognates, in Greek, and qum and its cognates in Hebrew) mean within that spectrum of belief?12

Chapters 2 and 3 address this question, clarifying in particular—a vital move, as we shall see—what the early Christians meant, and were heard to mean, when they spoke and wrote about Jesus’ resurrection.

As George Caird once pointed out, when a speaker declares ‘I’m mad about my flat’ it helps to know whether they are American (in which case they are angry about their puncture) or British (in which case they are enthusiastic about their living quarters).13

When the early Christians said ‘The Messiah was raised from the dead on the third day’, what might they have been heard to be saying? This may seem obvious to some readers, but it was by no means obvious, according to the evangelists, when Jesus said similar things to his followers, and a glance at contemporary literature will show that it remains far from obvious to many scholars today.14

As well as the question of meaning (what did this kind of talk mean at the time?) we must consider the question of derivation: what, if anything, did the Christian shaping of ideas and language about Easter owe to the wider context, both Jewish and non-Jewish?

Chapter 2 examines the non-Jewish world of the first century with these two questions in mind; chapters 3 and 4, developing the brief discussion in the first volume of this series, the Jewish world.15 Let me then spell out somewhat more fully the brief, almost formulaic account given a moment ago of how the argument develops from there.

I shall come at the main question of Parts II–IV by asking: granted the wide range of views about life after death in general and resurrection in particular, what did the early Christians believe on these topics, and how can we account for their beliefs?

This method recognizes that all knowledge of the past, as indeed of everything else, is mediated not only through sources but also through the perceptions, perceptions, and hence also the personalities, of the knowers.

There is no such thing as detached objectivity. (To say, therefore, that we can investigate other historical claims in a neutral or objective fashion, but that with the resurrection an element of subjectivity inevitably creeps in, is to ignore the fact that all historical work consists of a dialogue between the historian, in community with other historians, and the source materials; and that at every point the historians’ own worldview-perspectives are inevitably involved.)

But this does not mean that all knowledge collapses into mere subjectivity. There are ways of moving towards fair and true statements about the past.”

Wright, N. T.. Resurrection Son of God V3: Christian Origins and the Question of God (pp. 8-29). Fortress Press. Kindle Edition.

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Anyway, that’s enough fun for now. It is encouraging to know that there are other folks out there who see the current state of confusion in communication as problematic. I suspect the usual suspects calling me a “pedant” are not realy that sure what exactly “pedant” means anyway.

So for those who got this far, you must be amongst the blessed literate on this long journey.

Cheers

Joe

Ahhh,  time for another stress free “nice conversation with my friends”. Who cares what the words mean anyway, they just sound so “pleasantly conversational”.

But what would coffee be without a little scripture?  Paul would have recognized our current Canadian Political landscape … here is part of his letter to Timothy:

… But know this, that in the last days perilous times will come: For men will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy, unloving, unforgiving, slanderers, without self-control, brutal, despisers of good, traitors, headstrong, haughty, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, having a form of godliness but denying its power. …

Now as Jannes and Jambres resisted Moses, so do these also resist the truth: men of corrupt minds, disapproved concerning the faith; but they will progress no further, for their folly will be manifest to all, as theirs also was.

But you have carefully followed my doctrine, manner of life, purpose, faith, longsuffering, love, perseverance, persecutions, afflictions, which happened to me at Antioch, at Iconium, at Lystra– what persecutions I endured.

And out of them all the Lord delivered me. Yes, and all who desire to live godly in Christ Jesus will suffer persecution. But evil men and impostors will grow worse and worse, deceiving and being deceived. (2Ti 3:1-13)

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The Inner Struggle

Is there even one good thing?

Kojo No Tsuki” (Rentaro Taki), performed by Yo-Yo Ma, Michio Mamiya, & Patricia Zander, from the album “Japanese Melodies” (1990)

The original tenshu of Aizuwakamatsu Castle (1868),

The original tenshu of Aizuwakamatsu Castle (1868),

Just muddling along in the snow these days. Thoughts all over the map, and have been doing a lot of thinking about the scandal and controversy in the Roman Catholic Church. Been reading “Church Militant” blog, off and on for the last few weeks. We are in a real “take-no-prisoners” battle these days, and it often feels very much like we are losing.

But there is a silver lining to this storm, and that is that one must revisit and rethink comfortable conclusions taken for granted for years. It is safe to say that one is even encouraged by all this controversy to think outside the comfortable box.

I find myself revisiting modes of thought regarding the Church which I have not experienced since the late 60’s, and the disruption brought on in the Canadian Catholic Church by the “Spirit of Vatican II”.

That “Spirit” as expressed in Canada resulted in such events as the “Winnipeg Statement of 1968. and began a decades long de-facto schism between the Canadian Church and the Roman Catholic Church.

The Canadian Catholic Church has not fully recovered from this schism to this day. The Progressives, who made up the vast majority of the Canadian Council of Catholic Bishops (97 out of 100 bishops) took “their church” down a separate path from Rome which was decidedly not Catholic. The damage done by these men is incalculable, and we Canadian Catholics will be reaping this whirlwind for generations to come.

Now we are faced with an even more destructive leadership crisis emanating from Rome itself, but which has all its roots in “the Spirit” of Vatican II as well as many other crisis in Church history. Satan never rests:

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St. Louis de Montfort

St. Louis de Montfort

As St. Louis de Montfort (1673-1715) says ...”(Satan) knows that we have this treasure, which is worth more than Heaven and earth put together, in frail vessels, i.e., in a corruptible body and in a weak and inconstant soul, which a mere nothing disturbs and dejects: “We have this treasure in earthen vessels” (2 Cor. 4:7).

Because all the devils, are skillful thieves, who wish to surprise us unawares. They watch day and night for the favorable moment. and they go around about us incessantly to devour us and to snatch from us in one moment, by a sin, all the graces and merits we have gained for many years.

Their malice, their experience, their stratagems and their number ought to make us fear this misfortune immensely, especially when we see how many persons fuller of grace than we are, richer in virtues, better founded in experience and far higher exalted in sanctity, have been surprised, robbed and unhappily pillaged.

Ah! How many cedars of Lebanon, how many stars of the firmament, have we not seen fall miserably, and in the twinkling of an eye lose all their height and their brightness! Whence comes that sad and curious change? It was not for want of grace which is wanting to no man; but is was for want of humility.

They thought themselves capable of guarding their own treasures. They trusted in themselves, relied upon themselves. They thought their house secure enough, and their coffers strong enough, to keep the precious treasure of grace. It is because of that scarcely perceptible reliance upon themselves, though all the while it seemed to them that they were relying only on the grace of God, that the most just Lord permitted them to be robbed by leaving them to themselves.  … 

It is difficult to preserver in justice because of the strange corruption of the world. The world is now so corrupt it seems inevitable that religious hearts should be soiled, if not by its mud, at least by its dust; so that it has become a kind of miracle for anyone to remain in the midst of that impetuous torrent without being drowned in it or stripped by the pirates and the corsairs, in the midst of that pestilent air without being infected by it.”

St. Louis de Montfort, “True Devotion to Mary: With Preparation for Total Consecration” (Kindle Locations 1030-1040). KIC. Kindle Edition.

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One result of stepping outside my comfort zone, is a brief glimpse I have had that my “God” is not the “god” of our modern culture, nor, perhaps, the “God” of my Church, but rather something, someone, much, much, more, “GOD” for want of a better descriptor.

My “God” is not my buddy, not “nice”, not accommodating,  not fashionable, but he is Merciful, and Loving in sense of Agape, “the highest form of love, charity” and “the love of God for man and of man for God”, and He is above all a God of Justice who demands commitment … “Come, Follow Me”. He guarantees “Free Will” and the choices available with it. But He also insists on “Responsibility” for one’s choices and actions. And “Responsibility” is very much missing in action these days.

So what was I thinking about …  Oh, right, “god”, and “God”, and “GOD”.

Just going with a quote from another good book I have been reading, Not God’s Type: An Atheist Academic Lays Down Her Arms, by Holly Ordway.

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Holly Ordway

Holly Ordway

There are various levels of self-involving statements. If,  walking down the street, I say ‘I think that was the Number 10 bus,’ the statement is only minimally self-involving; I do not want to go where the Number 10 bus goes, and anyway I prefer to walk.

But if, arriving breathless at the bus-stop on the way to a vital appointment, I look despairingly up the street and say ‘I think that was the Number 10 bus,’ knowing that the next one is not due for another two hours and that there is no other means of arriving on time, the statement not only involves me, it plunges me into gloom.

The point is that one cannot say ‘Jesus of Nazareth was bodily raised from the dead’ with the minimal involvement of the first of those statements. If it happened, it matters. The world is a different place from what it would be if it did not happen.

Saying that ‘Jesus of Nazareth was bodily raised from the dead’ is not only a self-involving statement; it is a self-committing statement, going beyond a reordering of one’s private world into various levels of commitment to work out the implications.

We cannot simply leave a flag stuck on a hill somewhere and sail back home to safety.”

N.T. Wright, quoted by Holly Ordway, “Not God’s Type: An Atheist Academic Lays Down Her Arms” (Kindle Locations 1834-1844). Ignatius Press. Kindle Edition.

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It seems to me, now, that the Resurrection is the signal Truth of Christianity. The Truth of the Resurrection is the foundation of everything handed down to us, which we have been taught to believe, or in our wilfulness, have refused to believe.

I get a brief glimpse, here and there, that the “God” I have believed in all my life is not in fact the “GOD” which the Apostles, and the Fathers, and the Doctors of the Church believed in. The “God” that I have believed in is not the “GOD” which the Magisterium of the Church was intended to hand down to us and teach to us.

I have a sense that I am standing in a hurricane of ecclesial controversy and I have a suspicion that even the “God” that the modern church of Rome is talking about is not in fact the “GOD” of Peter, and Paul, and the rest of the Apostles and the first century Christians. Fleeting though this vision is it seems hugely important, and I keep trying to get my hands on it in a more permanent way.

Nicholas Thomas Wright FRSE (born 1 December 1948)

Nicholas Thomas Wright FRSE (born 1 December 1948)

Once we have glimpsed the true portrait of God, the onus is on us to reflect it: to reflect it as a community, to reflect it as individuals. The image of the true and living God, once revealed in all its glory, is to be reflected into all the world, as was always God’s intention.

The mission of the Church can be summed up in the phrase “reflected glory.” When we see, as Paul says, the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ, we see this not for our own benefit, but so that the glory may shine in us and through us to bring light to the world that still waits in darkness and the shadow of death.” N.T. Wright,

Are Catholics reflecting the true portrait of GOD right now? There is just so much more to the Truth than C.S. Lewis’ simple statement: Jesus was either mad, or bad, or he was “who he claimed to be.” Lewis was indeed trying to make it simple and did a very good job of it, but the Truth is further up, and further in!

Reading N.T. Wright is like cutting my way through a lush and fruitful jungle towards Understanding.

Cheers

Joe

 

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