Life in a small town

We are at War … in the Amazon?

We are at war … we “humanity” are at war. It is a “Civil War” of global proportions.

It’s Sunday morning, 27th Sunday of “Ordinary Time”.  Beware, the Arians are coming, (what exactly ARE we calling them these days?) dressed in rainbow robes and bringing a gospel of relativism and modernism. Be afraid, be very afraid, common knowledge would have us accept that the Son of God is not divine, not a Trinity at all, but simply part of a new Band …”Grandpa God and The Good Guys”

Civil War Field Hospital

Maybe a free concert at the Amazonian Synod, why not, have to entertain the peasants lest they be distracted and notice that we are tearing down the cathedral around them. Gotta keep all eyes on the stage. Is sarcasm or satire a sin?

Whether we know it or not, we are enveloped in a war of the most significant proportions. This is much more than a war of political ideologies, much more than a war over “real estate”, and certainly much more than a war over resources, or assets, or social policy.

These are all just different “fronts”, different “theaters” in this global war for dominance over the souls of humanity.

This is the ongoing battle between Good and evil. We often do not see it this way, but every thought, every word, every deed affects all of us – enlisted or not – because we are all enlisted in this supernatural civil war. There is no neutral ground.

This world, all of it, is the enemy’s kingdom. We are fighting a civil war, a civil war in which we are the Resistance, we are the “Freedom fighters”, the Guerilla Fighters, the Maquis, the Ghetto Fighters in this modern ghetto we call “Christianity”.

And the enemy is bringing all his power to bear on this pathetic ghetto to crush it absolutely. But the good news is that our warrior king has landed, with his pathfinders and “air support”.

We are in the midst of a universal “D day”. We are hanging on and awaiting the return of the King to this rebel province, in the nativity, life, crucifixion, resurrection and Real Presence, body, blood, soul and divinity, of our Lord Jesus Christ to lead us, guide us, comfort us and heal us.

11And I saw heaven opened: and behold a white horse. And he that sat upon him was called faithful and true: and with justice doth he judge and fight. 12And his eyes were as a flame of fire: and on his head were many diadems. And he had a name written, which no man knoweth but himself. 13And he was clothed with a garment sprinkled with blood. And his name is called: THE WORD OF GOD.

14And the armies that are in heaven followed him on white horses, clothed in fine linen, white and clean. 15And out of his mouth proceedeth a sharp two-edged sword, that with it he may strike the nations. And he shall rule them with a rod of iron: and he treadeth the winepress of the fierceness of the wrath of God the Almighty. 16And he hath on his garment and on his thigh written: KING OF KINGS AND LORD OF LORDS. (Rev. 19:11-16)

Dakota & Paratroops training at Ft. Benning

The sacrament of the Holy Eucharist and the sacrament of Reconciliation are our MRE’s and our MASH unit. The biggest wounds we experience are fear, despair, depression, misery, feeling unworthy, and failure to trust Jesus.

These wounds are inflicted in the 5th column propaganda war waged by this world, by which the prince of this world, the ultimate rebel, seeks to divide us and lead us to desert to his side in this eternal war, to embrace self worship and the treasures of this world.

In our Church, the Holy Eucharist is considered the sacrament of sacraments. It’s the one at the center of our faith. And yet, it’s also so mysterious and miraculous that many of us – at one time or another – may have inadvertently taken it for granted. But it remains the most important nourishment we ever get.

In John 6:51, 54, 56, Jesus said “I am the living bread that came down from heaven; if any one eats of this bread, he will live for ever; . . . he who eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life and . . . abides in me, and I in him.”  From this we are renewed daily and draw strength to continue the battle.

According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Jesus “gives us in the Eucharist the pledge of glory with him. Participation in the Holy Sacrifice identifies us with his Heart, sustains our strength along the pilgrimage of this life, makes us long for eternal life, and unites us even now to the Church in heaven, the Blessed Virgin Mary, and all the saints.”

The sacrament of Reconciliation is how we are healed of our wounds and is a fundamental part of the Church’s life and mission. Christ’s victory over sin is a realty in the life of the Church and the world. It is important to realize that the Sacrament of Forgiveness and Reconciliation is the power of Christ’s redeeming blood made effective in our personal lives.

In most of the world the Sacrament of Reconciliation is largely neglected. This is because of the great decline in the moral and religious conscience of our society. The neglect is rooted in our failure to take seriously our lack of love and justice and God’s offer of reconciling mercy.

John Martin – Le Pandemonium – in the Louvre Museum

We are unwilling to accept maturely and responsibility the consequences of the objective truths of our faith, and the responsibility for the results of our actions and lack of actions, our thoughts words and deeds in our daily lives.

Christ’s forgiveness is offered to each individual by means of sacramental absolution given by his ministers of penance. The administration of this sacrament is the primary duty and requirement of His ministers of penance and there is no substitute for this means of Grace which Christ Himself has placed in our hands.

The Good Shepherd lays down his life to protect his sheep. And, from John 6:32 “My Father gives you the true bread from heaven“.  Jesus tries to teach us that we set our sights too low, that we have blinders on.  He has so much more in store for us than ordinary bread, the bread of this world with no past and no future.  The link below to Randall Smith’s article on “Limits” will put you into an excellent article about where we are today in this civil war in which we are engaged. It’s worth every second it takes to read it.

“Remi Brague, French Catholic philosopher and winner of the prestigious Ratzinger Prize, in a lecture at the University of St. Thomas,  suggested that the “secular” are those whose lives are defined by a horizon of a hundred years. “That is simply what the word ‘secular’ means,” he declared.

Rémi Brague at the University of St. Thomas, Houston

In this simple statement we see the difference between a “secular” view of the world as opposed to one whose vantage point is “eternity”. “1940 – Christianity is finished. Communism is the future”.  “The march of progress – think of the good we might gain from killing this embryo.” 

“Witness our current fancy for relativising  and destroying human dignity – the disposable asset called Man”.  “A never ending frenetic pursuit of a theoretical utopia, or never ending despair, cynicism and nihilism when the latest utopia proves illusory”.

The next big thing, the next big catastrophe. On our side we are fighting for eternity and our King and Saviour. The enemy has an event horizon delimited by the next cup of coffee, the next News cycle, the next paycheck, or whatever the current goal du jour might be.

From a genuine  historical point of view, current, secular, cultural accomplishments disappear almost over night. We look around and they are gone. Liberal socialism, a decaying leper. Liberal Democracy, reality programming for dummies, who will we vote off the island now.  Communism, dead as a door-nail and taking millions with it. Atheism, screaming loudly as it swirls towards the drain.

Global Warming, nuf said. Social medicine, unsustainable. Fossil fuels, killing the planet. Social Assistance and food stamps, slavery for life. “Public Education”, dumb down, dumb down, dumb down into daycare for post natal infants. Social Credit, gone. Whigs & Tories, unrecognizable.

WWII – why?  Hitler, gone. Stalin, gone. Pol Pot, gone. Mao, gone. The dirty 30’s, the roaring 20’s, WWI, the Great War – what was so great?  The sun never sets on the British Empire, Long live the Queen. Hearts of Oak, Rule Britannia. Hapsburgs, The Third Republic, the second republic, La Republic, Liberte Egalite Fraternite, gone, all gone. The Holy Roman Empire, the original Roman Empire.

All gone, pick your 100 years,  whatever you thought was the current great is like this morning’s snow, starting out hushed and pristine white and degenerating into a sloppy muddy mess requiring cleanup. and all the souls who chased these wisps are lost.

So through it all, if you take the long view, the eternal view, what we see is a continuous battle of good against no good, of God against no god.  All the rest is sound and fury, lipstick on a pig, and without the long view we are trapped in the sound and fury, putting our lipstick on, getting ready for the next dance.

So which side do you choose?  God or no god?  That is really the only choice. Choose wisely for the sake of eternity.

Dominus Vobiscum

Joe

Son rise ...

Son Rise

Standard
Politics and Economics, The Inner Struggle

Values …

I have long opined that when you reward bad behaviour you get more of it … whatever the definition of “bad” is.

I just finished reading another article by Randall Smith which I would like to pass on. I think it makes an extremely important point about our society and culture at this time.  Randall B. Smith is the Scanlan Professor of Theology at the University of St. Thomas in Houston. His most recent book, Reading the Sermons of Thomas Aquinas: A Beginner’s Guide, is now available at Amazon and from Emmaus Academic Press. the rest of his articles are here.

Here is a short excerpt:

*****

I attended an amazing conference the other day at the Catholic University of America of the sort one never expects to find these days – that is to say, with actual diversity. Talks by academics mixed with those by business people, some from small businesses and others from large corporations. The former CEO of Home Depot and Chrysler was on a panel, as was a guy who graduated a few years ago from Franciscan University Steubenville who provides rental housing in New York. Then there was an impressive Muslim man from MIT who figured out how to get cell phones and cell phone service to 12-million people in Bangladesh when everyone told him it couldn’t be done. I can barely get cell phone service on my own phone. Guys like this astonish me.

Just to give you a sense of how odd this gathering was, we heard back-to-back interviews with Charles Koch (yes, that Charles Koch) and Cardinal Peter Turkson, Prefect for the Vatican Council for the Promotion of Human Development. Each man made his case respectfully before an audience of attentive listeners, including a large number of university students who sat quietly and listened respectfully to both men without charging the stage. At a university! I know; it’s crazy.

Charles Koch and a Roman Catholic cardinal from the Vatican: now that’s something you’re not going to see at Harvard, Princeton, or Yale for a whole host of reasons. So kudos to Catholic U., the Busch School of Business, and the Ciocca Center for Principled Entrepreneurship for pulling it off.”

*****

Read the rest here.

Cheers

Joe

 

Standard